New publication in European Journal of Industrial Relations

The European Journal of Industrial Relations just accepted our paper “Social versus Liberal Collective Skill Formation Systems? A Comparative-Historical Analysis of the Role of Trade Unions in German and Swiss VET”. Here is the abstract:

We distinguish between social and liberal collective skill formation systems, and demonstrate that the German VET system is a social system with a strong (parity) role for trade unions in its governance. In contrast, unions play a considerably weaker role in the more liberal Swiss system, which privileges employers’ interests. We show that the different position of unions in VET systems has the expected consequences on a range of indicators. We further examine why unions are less important in Switzerland, and show how, after the First World War, differences in the institutional environment and power resources of the union movements set Germany and Switzerland on different paths, which are still visible today.

New Post on DeFacto

DeFacto just published a post on our new Electoral Studies (Majority Protection: The Origins of Distorted Proportional Representation). See here (in German).

New Contributions on VET

Two new contributions on VET governance in Switzerland:

Together with Lina Seitzl, I have penned the “Expertenbericht zur systemischen Steuerung der Berufsbildung in der Schweiz”, which has now been submitted to the Staatssekretariat für Bildung, Forschung und Innovation (SBFI) for evaluation.

The SGAB-Newsletter has covered my work with Alexandra Strebel and Lukas Graf on the Swiss Organisations of the World of Work (OdA). URL: https://www.sgab-srfp.ch/de/newsletter/die-vielen-motoren-der-berufsbildung

New publication in Electoral Studies

My paper “Majority Protection? The Origins of Distorted Proportional Representation” (co-authored with André Walter) has just been accepted for publication in Electoral Studies. Here is the abstract: 

Not all proportional representation (PR) systems are equally proportional. Some PR systems favour large parties and are thus ‘distorted’. What explains the origins of distorted PR? Research on the adoption of PR has identified both consensual and conflict- ridden roads to PR. We argue that these two roads to PR do not lead to the same outcome. We expect the adoption of PR by consensus to result in less proportional PR systems compared to cases in which PR is forced upon powerful parties. Empirically, we find no evidence that powerful parties introduced PR to grant minority groups better political representation. Instead, we show that when PR was adopted with the support of the most powerful party, reforms often resulted in distorted PR and small seat losses for the most powerful party.

New paper in Socio-Economic Review

My contribution to the book symposium on Brooke Harrington’s “Capital without Borders: Wealth Managers and the One Percent” will soon appear in the Socio-Economic Review. The paper is entitled: “Masters of grey zones and elusive champions of the tax ‘optimization’ industry”.

New publication in Regulation & Governance

Regulation & Governance just accepted my manuscript “Why Do Junctures Become Critical? Political Discourse, Agency, and Joint Belief Shifts in Comparative Perspective” (co-authored with Adrian Rinscheid, Burkard Eberleinand Volker Schneider. Here is the abstract:

Why do junctures become critical in some cases but not in others? Building on the critical juncture framework and perspectives on the formation and diffusion of beliefs, we develop a theoretically parsimonious and empirically traceable account of divergence in institutional outcomes. By illuminating the role of agency and joint belief shifts we further open the ‘black box’ of critical junctures.In particular, we develop the argument that the role agents play is conditioned by conflict lines that structure an institutional field before a juncture sets in. Empirically, we trace political discourses around the 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident in Canada, Germany, and Japan using Discourse Network Analysis. Through comparative investigation, we show empirically that discursive interactions during potential critical junctures indicate institutional outcomes that are shaped by causally relevant historical legacies.

Government Composition Dataset now available

Our new dataset “Partisan Competition of Cantonal Governments in Switzerland, 1848-2017” is now available. Here is the link to the Harvard Dataverse. Please mention the following source when using the dataset:

Walter, André and Patrick Emmenegger (2018): The Partisan Composition of Cantonal Governments in Switzerland, 1848-2017: A New Data Set, Swiss Political Science Review, forthcoming.